Laotian American Data

 
 

265K

total laotian americans

12%

of laotian americans have attained a bachelor degree

15%

of laotian americans live in poverty

$54K

annual median household income

 

Total Laotian American Population: 265,138*

Population by State (collapse this into a dropdown)

Alabama: 1,248

Arizona: 3,434

Arkansas: 4,953

California: 82,934

Colorado: 3,462

Connecticut: 4,553

District of Columbia: 0

Florida: 8,386

Georgia: 7,211

Hawaii: 2,663

Illinois: 7,930

Indiana: 1,560

Iowa: 5,622

Kansas: 6,215

Kentucky: 1,540

Louisiana: 2,522

Maryland: 974

Massachusetts: 7,115

Michigan: 5,081

Minnesota: 11,988

Missouri: 744

Nebraska: 1,010

Nevada: 2,669

New Hampshire: 629

New Jersey: 369

New York: 6,385

North Carolina: 7,621

Ohio: 7,353

Oklahoma: 4,755

Pennsylvania: 4,767

South Carolina: 2,004

Tennessee: 5,763

Texas: 14,934

Utah: 3,874

Virginia: 4,470

Washington: 11,321

West Virigina: 0

Wisconsin: 4,613

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2017 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates

*Estimates of urban and rural populations, housing units, and characteristics reflect boundaries of urban areas defined based on Census 2010 data. As a result, data for urban and rural areas from the ACS do not necessarily reflect the results of ongoing urbanization.

Data are based on a sample and are subject to sampling variability. The degree of uncertainty for an estimate arising from sampling variability is represented through the use of a margin of error. The value shown here is the 90 percent margin of error. The margin of error can be interpreted roughly as providing a 90 percent probability that the interval defined by the estimate minus the margin of error and the estimate plus the margin of error (the lower and upper confidence bounds) contains the true value. In addition to sampling variability, the ACS estimates are subject to nonsampling error (for a discussion of nonsampling variability, see Accuracy of the Data). The effect of nonsampling error is not represented in these tables.


English proficiency of Laotian population in the U.S., 2015

english-proficiency-laotian-american-population-us-2015

Note: Proficient English speakers are those who speak only English at home, or if they speak a non-English language at home, they indicate they can speak English at least “very well.” Due to data limitations, figures for Laotians based on single-race population only, regardless of Hispanic origin. Figures for all Asians based on mixed-race and mixed-group populations, regardless of Hispanic origin. See methodology for more detail.

Source: Pew Research Center analysis of 2013-2015 American Community Survey (IPUMS)


Length of time in the U.S. for Laotian immigrants, 2000-2015

length-of-time-in-us-for-laotian-immigrants-2015

Note: Figures may not sum to 100% due to rounding. Due to data limitations, figures for Laotians based on single-race population only, regardless of Hispanic origin. See methodology for more detail.

Source: Pew Research Center analysis of 2000 decennial census, 2008-2010 American Community Survey 3-year file, and 2013-2015 American Community Survey (IPUMS).


Educational attainment of Laotian population in the U.S., 2015

educational-attainment-laotian-american-population-us-2015

Note: “High school” refers to those who have attained a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Education Development (GED) certificate. “Some college” includes those with an associate degree and those who attended college but did not obtain a degree. Figures may not sum to 100% due to rounding. Due to data limitations, figures for Laotians based on single-race population only, regardless of Hispanic origin. Figures for all Asians based on mixed-race and mixed-group populations, regardless of Hispanic origin. See methodology for more detail.

Source: Pew Research Center analysis of 2013-2015 American Community Survey (IPUMS).


U.S. Laotian population living in poverty, 2015

us-laotian-population-poverty-2015

Note: Poverty status is determined for individuals in housing units and noninstitutional group quarters. It is unavailable for children younger than 15 who are not related to the householder, people living in institutional group quarters and people living in college dormitories or military barracks. Due to the way in which the IPUMS assigns poverty values, these data will differ from those provided by the U.S. Census Bureau. Due to data limitations, figures for Laotians based on single-race population only, regardless of Hispanic origin. Figures for all Asians based on mixed-race and mixed-group populations, regardless of Hispanic origin. See methodology for more detail.

Source: Pew Research Center analysis of 2013-2015 American Community Survey (IPUMS).


Top 10 U.S. metropolitan areas by Laotian population, 2015

top-10-us-metropolitan-area-by-laotian-population-2015

Note: Due to data limitations, figures for Laotians based on single-race population only, regardless of Hispanic origin. See methodology for more detail.

Source: Pew Research Center analysis of 2013-2015 American Community Survey (IPUMS).


Demographic characteristics of U.S. Laotian population, 2015

Screen Shot 2019-02-13 at 7.49.05 PM.png

Note: Family households are those with a household head and one or more persons living in the household who are related to the household head by birth, marriage or adoption. Households with a household head and an unmarried partner are only considered family households if there are other persons in the household who are related to the household head by birth, marriage or adoption. Multigenerational households are households with two or more adult generations or one that includes grandparents and grandchildren. Figures may not sum to 100% due to rounding. Due to data limitations, figures for Laotians based on single-race population only, regardless of Hispanic origin. Figures for all Asians based on mixed-race and mixed-group populations, regardless of Hispanic origin. See methodology for more detail.

Source: Pew Research Center analysis of 2013-2015 American Community Survey (IPUMS).


Economic characteristics of U.S. Laotian population, 2015

Screen Shot 2019-02-13 at 7.51.07 PM.png

The symbol *** indicates insufficient number of observations to provide a reliable estimate.

Note: The household population excludes persons living in institutions, college dormitories and other group quarters. Households are classified by the race or detailed Asian group of the head. “Full-time, year-round workers” are defined as people ages 16 and older who usually worked at least 35 hours per week and at least 48 weeks in the past year. The share of the population ages 16 and older who are not employed differs from the unemployment rate because the share not employed is based on the total population, while the unemployment rate is based on those who are in the labor force (i.e. working or looking for work). Poverty status is determined for individuals in housing units and non-institutional group quarters. It is unavailable for children younger than 15 who are not related to the householder, people living in institutional group quarters and people living in college dormitories or military barracks. Due to the way in which the IPUMS assigns poverty values, these data will differ from those provided by the U.S. Census Bureau. Figures may not sum to 100% due to rounding. Due to data limitations, figures for Laotians based on single-race population only, regardless of Hispanic origin. Figures for all Asians based on mixed-race and mixed-group populations, regardless of Hispanic origin. See methodology for more detail.

Source: Pew Research Center analysis of 2013-2015 American Community Survey (IPUMS).